Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Navigate Up
Sign In

DHMH Press Releases :

DHMH Press Releases > Posts > DHMH Working with CDC to Investigate Salmonella Outbreak
 

 Posts

 
April 04
DHMH Working with CDC to Investigate Salmonella Outbreak

BALTIMORE (April 4, 2012) – The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) and Maryland local health departments are working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and public health officials in several other states to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella serotype Bareilly infections. Salmonella Bareilly is an uncommon serotype of Salmonella. There have been eight cases confirmed in Maryland, all of them in the Baltimore Metropolitan Area. None of the Maryland cases has been hospitalized.
 
The investigation is ongoing, and has not yet conclusively identified a food source for the infections. In initial interviews, at least some of the affected individuals reported consuming sushi, sashimi, or similar foods in a variety of locations in the week before becoming ill.
 
Symptoms of Salmonella bacteria infection included diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 6 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 2 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some cases, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient requires hospitalization. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics. Older adults, infants, and those with impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness from Salmonella infection.
 
More information about salmonellosis can be found at the DHMH website http://ideha.dhmh.maryland.gov/SitePages/salmonellosis.aspx. Additional information and steps people can take to reduce their risk of infection with Salmonella in general can be found on the CDC Salmonella Web Page ( http://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/general/index.html ) and the CDC Vital Signs Web Page ( http://www.cdc.gov/VitalSigns/FoodSafety/ ). Individuals who think they might have become ill from eating a potentially contaminated food product should consult their health care providers.
 
DHMH and CDC will update the public on the progress of this investigation as information becomes available.
###
 
Stay connected: www.twitter.com/MarylandDHMH or www.facebook.com/MarylandDHMH
 

Comments

There are no comments for this post.

Comments

There are no comments for this post.